There are many similar sauces in different regional cuisines. Fermented chilies are used for making some variations of famous Thai sriracha. There are popular Louisiana hot chili pepper souses that also use fermentation to add subtle acidity to the taste. The taste of fermented sauces is very different from mass production sauces with vinegar. It is more complex and intelligent. This recipe is for a very mild sauce. It allows to modify the level of heat by changing the ratio of sweet and hot peppers.

What a week! I completed my first week of full-time contracting, and I had two incredible cooking workshops. My two, not related to each other jobs kept me very busy. Both of them were great sources for new knowledge and experience. It was a big week for me.

Both classes were planned long time ago. The one on Thursday was organized by four enthusiastic women who run Much Ado About … Academy, a Texas educational nonprofit organization. We found each other via Thumbtack. It was a few weeks before Thanksgiving, when I saw a request for de-boning poultry class. I imagined a group of 10 home cooks, who were going to get together to debone their chickens a few days before the holiday. After the class, I thought, they’d take their deboned chickens, recipes, and cooking instructions home, and make a beautiful galantine for the Thanksgiving meal. It as a wonderful party idea! I immediately responded. When we’ve met, I found out that the four brave women were organizing an event in January. They simply believed it’s a useful skill to learn for every day cooking. I expressed doubts about 10 beginners to respond, when it is so easy to dine out. Today I stand corrected. The class had a great response and all tickets were sold.

My Thursday guests probably have no idea how much admiration they deserve. I have a great respect for all people who make an effort to step out of their comfort zone, roll up their sleeves, and learn a new skill. It is even more valuable, when the most common reaction to the skill is “ewwww”. If after the class you visit my web site, I want you to know — it was an honor for me to meet you all!

Even though I do not de-bone chickens every day, it’s an easy and fast preparation step for me. At the same time, I was a beginner home cook once. I remember how watching videos didn’t help much. This video of Chef Jacques Pepin is probably one the best out there. But, even this video can’t replace a real-life learning experience. Most of us can afford practicing with only one chicken at a time. It is one real chicken we have to prepare for a real family dinner. If something goes wrong, there is no way we can undo it. In addition, all chickens are different. Some of them have broken or fragile bones. Others have stronger and tougher muscles and connective tissues. That’s why a group workshop is so good. There are more different chickens to deal with. There are different people to de-bone them. All participants can learn from each other, sharing possible issues and ways to avoid them.

The second class this week was the Thai seafood block, and I was very excited since it’s my favorite of all Thai food series. Ethnic cuisine workshops differ from other cooking classes. They are designed as an introduction to regional food. They also are the best for those who want to develop a palate, because I give a lot of information about how to create and manipulate food tastes. For example, this time my guests had an opportunity to taste Tom Kha Thale on different stages and experience how adding more lime juice, or fish sauce, or brown sugar, or a few more thin slices of chili pepper affected the final taste. “My only problem with this soup is,” said one of my guests Monica, “I’d eat it all by myself!” To hear that is my true reward.

My favorite part is when my guests sit down and enjoy their meal at the end of the event. Sometimes, it is something I cooked for them in advance; sometime it’s the food we cooked together. I answer the questions and listen to the feedbacks. When I hear that people are making plans to shop for ingredients and try repeating at home what they’ve learned, I am happy. That’s my goal. I want my guests to leave my kitchen inspired. I want them to believe they can do it on their own. It won’t be perfect the first time, but with every repetition they will be more and more confident.

Quite a few of my recent guests were interested in a sauce I used for cooking for them or mentioned and let them sample during the class — fermented Fresno and Bell Peppers sauce. I promised to share the recipe. This sauce was one of the ingredients used in stuffing for the galantine served at the end of the deboning chicken class.

Enjoy cooking at home!

Fresno and Bell Pepper Fermented Sauce

There are many similar sauces in different regional cuisines. Fermented chilies are used for making some variations of famous Thai sriracha. There are popular Louisiana hot chili pepper souses that also use fermentation to add subtle acidity to the taste. The taste of fermented sauces is very different from mass production sauces with vinegar. It is more complex and intelligent. This recipe is for a very mild sauce. It allows to modify the level of heat by changing the ratio of sweet and hot peppers.
Prep Time15 mins
Total Time18 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Thai
Keyword: chili pepper, condiment, garlic, lycooking, lyukum cooking lab, recipe, sauce, vegetables
Servings: 2 cups

Ingredients

  • 13 Fresno chili peppers stem, seeds, and membranes removed
  • 3 Bell sweet peppers large; stem, seeds, and membranes removed
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 2 % kosher salt

Instructions

  • Thinly slice peppers and garlic.
  • Mix them and weigh. 2% of the total weight is the amount of salt you need to add. Add salt and sugar, mix well making sure they are distributes equally. In about 25-30 minutes salt will draw a lot of pepper juices.
    Fresno and Bell Pepper Fermented Sauce
  • Place a small plate on top of the vegetables and a container filled with cold water on the plate. They will serve as weight that keeps fermenting vegetables under the surface of the liquid. You want them submerged.
  • Allow to ferment for 3 days in room temperature. Do not cover with a lid. Aerate the mixture once a day by stirring. Once fermentation is complete, place peppers and garlic in a food processor and blend to desired texture.
  • Sterilize a mason jar before using it for the sauce. Keep refrigerated for up to 6 months.
Fresno and Bell Pepper Fermented Sauce