Tongue of the Mother-in-Law

The “Mother-in-Law” may have an angry sting, but it has the flavor and wisdom developed over many generations.

January 31, 2015
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Som Tam, Green Papaya Salad

It was during my vacation on Hawaii Big Island, on the farmers market in Hilo. I stopped at Ratana’s food trailer and watched her making salads. Seeing the process and being exposed to all the aromas coming from her mortar made me hungry and curious. I tasted her Som Tam and… became an addict. How this famous Thai salad had escaped my attention before? What else was I missing in Thai food?

January 16, 2015
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Ten-Minute Cakes: Quasi-English-Muffin

They are also known as microwave cakes. In a world of foams they are solid foams. Pastry chefs describe them as a sponge with delicate and feathery texture. You need a blender, a whipping siphon, a microwave, and 10 minutes of time to make them.

January 13, 2015
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Pkhali

Pkhali (ფხალი) is a signature Georgian appetizer. Its consistency is similar to pesto and tapenade. Pkhali’s main ingredients are cooked vegetables and walnuts mixed with traditional herbs and spices. If you don’t aim for authenticity, and rather prefer to explore your own vegetables-nuts-herbs-spices variations, play with different nuts and seeds. Use your favorite spice mixes and herbs instead of Utskho Suneli and Khmeli Suneli. You won’t be able to name your dish “pkhali”, but you’ll enjoy it for sure.

January 13, 2015
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Okonomiyaki, Osaka Style

Okonomiyaki is a Japanese pancake made of shredded cabbage mixed with a variety of ingredients and some batter. Cooked okonomiyaki is served with okonomi sauce, Japanese mayonnaise, katsuobushi, and aonori. All these components are important.

Okonomiyaki originated from the Osaka and Hiroshima areas (West) of Japan. The name means “what you like, grilled”. Okonomi means “what you want” or “what you like”, yaki means “grilled” or “cooked”.

January 12, 2015
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Medieval British Fruitcake

This recipe is to two big loafs of fruitcake. Be patient and let it mature for a month. It’ll smell like holidays and taste like old magic — a true Christmas treat!

January 12, 2015
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Ossetian Pies

Ossetian pies are a culinary phenomenon. People taste them once and crave for the rest of their lives.

January 7, 2015
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Magic Beans

For a long time, I was not a big fan of beans. I didn’t like either cooking or eating them until I tried marinated with pesto giant Lima beans once. They were relatively expensive, so I decided to learn to make them at home. Eventually, I discovered a no-hustle way of cooking legumes in my Crock-Pot. Later, I’ve got an Instant Pot, and the process became even easier and faster. I keep strained beans in a covered container refrigerated for up to 4 days and use them for soups, salads, stir-fries, snacks, etc. Isn’t it convenient for a busy home cook? Dry Lima beans absorb a lot of water when cooking, so a cup of dry beans (~8 oz) becomes 3 cups of cooked beans. Follow the link for instructions on how to cook giant Lima beans using slow or pressure cookers without presoak.

January 5, 2015
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The Feast of Seven Fishes: “Fur Coat” Dressed Salted Herring

Thinly sliced potatoes, carrots, and young beets are layered with salted herring, eggs, onions, and mayo to make n appetizer version of famous Eastern European salad known as “Fur Coat”.

January 5, 2015
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