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Ramen: Creamy Chicken Stock | Tori Paitan | 鶏ガラパイタン

Creamy chicken stock for ramen is now my number two favorite after tonkotsu. Torikotsu uses the same technique but requires less time and efforts to make it than tonkotsu — it is much easier to gelatinise chicken cartilage and connective tissues and extract flavors from less dense chicken bones. Most of the myoglobin is neutralized during the fist step of soaking chicken in cold water. To make it efficient, chop chicken wings and legs to smaller, 1-2″ pieces to expose bones marrow. As a result, there is significantly less scum to skim during the second step. Just like for tonkotsu, it is essential to remove the foam that appears, but keep the chicken fat and emulsify it into the creamy stock later, during the rapid boiling. Pressure cookers are very helpful and streamline the last stage of making chicken paitan even more if you are working on just a few portions. For the recipe below, use a 10-quart stock pot.

February 16, 2017
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Pho Bo with Beef Tendon and Tail

It’s raining, it’s gloomy and dark, perfect weather to eat a bowl of steamy hot Pho Bo — to warm your soul, to wake up your tastebuds! Last year, I made my the first and the best Pho at home, because it was 100% to my taste. I also managed to adjust the recipe logistics to a busy lifestyle. In other words, no need to stay hours in the kitchen to enjoy a bowl of good Pho Bo at home.

There are many good Pho recipes available online. My version is based on Andrea Nguyen’s Beef Pho Noodle Soup Recipe (Pho Bo), where you can find a lot of detailed information about Pho.

December 4, 2016
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Grin for Green! Ox Tail Green Borsch

Long time ago, I was sure green borsch is unique for Ukrainian cuisine. In reality, a similar dish exists in many cuisines all over the world. For regions with four-season climates, a soup with local greens is a must. Like for red, there are many variations of green borsch in Ukraine. This recipe is one of my variations with a strong ox tail stock. Use any stock of your choice, or even water. Adjust the toppings to you taste and diet. Sorrel and other greens are the main hero in this soup, they create the flavor and pack it with spring goodness!

April 8, 2015
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Magic Beans

For a long time, I was not a big fan of beans. I didn’t like either cooking or eating them until I tried marinated with pesto giant Lima beans once. They were relatively expensive, so I decided to learn to make them at home. Eventually, I discovered a no-hustle way of cooking legumes in my Crock-Pot. Later, I’ve got an Instant Pot, and the process became even easier and faster. I keep strained beans in a covered container refrigerated for up to 4 days and use them for soups, salads, stir-fries, snacks, etc. Isn’t it convenient for a busy home cook? Dry Lima beans absorb a lot of water when cooking, so a cup of dry beans (~8 oz) becomes 3 cups of cooked beans. Follow the link for instructions on how to cook giant Lima beans using slow or pressure cookers without presoak.

January 5, 2015
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