Boring British Food | New Yorkshire Pudding

It’s been five years since Boring British Food project came to an end. It was a lot of fun to collaborate with my friend Katya who published more than a dozen books about the Victorian era. We discovered a remarkable number of dishes from the British Islands that became regular in my kitchen. The Yorkshire Pudding is one of them. Our version makes fast and easy dinner, and it is true to Yorkshire Pudding historical roots. Winter is an excellent time to enjoy it!

January 29, 2019
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Miso Marinated and Roasted Fish | Saikyo Yaki

Saikyo Miso originated in Kyoto — a city that has been a center of politics, economics, and culture for more than a thousand years—and has been cultivated by the elegance of royalty. (Saikyo means “west city,” the former name for Kyoto.) Saikyo Miso has been a valuable part of the Imperial Palace’s hare (soul rejuvenation) ceremonies and has developed along with the food culture of the capital city. It is known for its generous amount of rice malt, its sweetness due to its low sodium content, and its beautiful light beige color.

The fermentation period for this miso is relatively short which contributes to the color and the buttery, smooth consistency. Compared with other miso, saikyo has the least amount of salt (5 percent to 10 percent) which minimizes the intense flavor to a naturally sweet, mild taste. Fish fillets are marinated in sweet miso for at least 2-3 days or up to 5-7 days for thicker slices before being grilled.

July 14, 2018
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As American As: Oysters

It’s amusing to read historical recipes and observe how the perception of foods changes over time. At first, all those stories about delicacies we highly value today being served as dog or prison food in old times seem shocking and funny. On the second thought, it’s logical. It’s in human nature to praise what is not easily available and disregard what is more abundant. Oysters are different. “There were always oysters, and there were those to praise them.” Are oysters to be admired forever?

November 24, 2017
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Green Harissa with Hatch

Harissa is the basic flavoring agent in Tunisian cuisine. This recipe is based on Yotam Ottolenghi’s harissa recipe, which uses red hot chiles, tomato paste, red onion, and lemon juice. We are replacing all red with all green — green tomatoes, local green chiles, and key lime juice. This recipe is used for making Shakshuka with Hatch and Dukkah.

August 8, 2017
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Bulgogi Under the Broil

Cooking bulgogi outdoors over smoking charcoal is, of course, number one choice. The second choice is grilling the beef on a skillet over very high heat. My recipe is intended to show how to broil bulgogi. Broiling allows making large portions of meat to serve at the same time without mess and hassle. It also requires the least amount of oil and your efforts. Think about it as a cooking method you can utilize for other marinades and meats that belong to different cuisines.

April 23, 2017
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Dumplings: Dargin Khinkal

If you are with me for a long time, you already know about my roots and my fascination with layered dough. They come together in this recipe. I’ve seen dargin khinkal on pictures and videos only and know about its taste and texture from somebody else’s descriptions. The combination of boiled beef and garlicky tsahdon (sauce) is the treat from my childhood, one of the dishes my grandma used to make for me.

January 29, 2017
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Pork Ribs: Cowboy Bigos

There are magical recipes so simple, a child can follow and get professional quality results. They do not require any special skills or equipment. I’m serious! I shared this recipe with my friends, clients, strangers, who were experienced and inexperienced, poor and rich, teenage students and mature adults, cooking for one or for large family — they all made perfectly cooked ribs.

When you pack seasoned ribs relatively tight in foil and cook it low (270-300F) and slow (~3 hours), you do not let any moisture to escape. Thus, you keep in all the juices and flavors of meat, bones, cartilage, and fat. They gelatinize tough tissues and concentrate. The result is full of flavor and melts in your mouth!

January 18, 2016
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She is Your Lobster! Cook for her!

“Come on, you guys. It’s a known fact that lobsters fall in love and mate for life. You know what? You can actually see old lobster couples walkin’ around their tank, you know, holding claws like…”

February 14, 2015
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